Why Join Us

By joining Freemasonry, you’ll be making a commitment to yourself and to your Brother Masons to be the best man you can be. And by taking the obligations of this ancient Fraternity, you will be joining millions of Freemasons across the globe who are also committed to helping each other develop their potential and improve the quality of life for themselves, their families, and communities.

By joining, you will become the latest in a long line of men from all walks of life – world leaders and everyday men – who have found inspiration in Freemasonry, and who strive to live by the values of honour, integrity, equality and brotherhood.

When you become a Mason, you join a lodge, which can be thought of as the local chapter or club of the larger organization, the Grand Lodge. The name goes back hundreds of years, to when all Masons were taught, “A Lodge is a place where members assemble and work.” That idea still holds true today, and we talk about joining “the Lodge.” that Freemasonry, “takes a good man and makes him better”.

How to become a Freemason
Any man who is at least 21 years of age, is law-abiding, of good character and believes in a greater being can become a Freemason. Freemasonry is one of the world’s oldest and largest non-religious, non-political, fraternal and charitable organisations.

For many, its biggest draw is that members come from all walks of life and meet as equals whatever their race, religion or socio-economic position in society. Its values are based on integrity, kindness, honesty and fairness. Freemasonry provides a unique environment for people who want to make lasting friendships, achieve their potential and have fun. If you have friends or family who are Freemasons, they will be happy to talk to you about becoming a Freemason and can give you advice and share their experiences.

Based on :- Integrity, Friendship, Respect
The traditions of Freemasonry are founded upon the building of King Solomon’s Temple, and its fraternal ceremonies use the working tools of the stonemasons to symbolize moral lessons of Brotherly Love, Relief and Truth.

For example, Masons are reminded at Lodge to “meet upon the level of equality, act by the plumb of uprightness, and part upon the square of virtue.”

Freemasonry is not meant in any way to interfere with an individual’s commitment to his faith, family or occupation. Freemasonry is not and never can be a replacement for these important institutions; rather, it is a positive environment that reminds every Mason of himself, his family, community and the Supreme Architect (an individual’s own definition of a Supreme Being.)